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20121001
20121031
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KQED (PBS) 9
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WMPT (PBS) 8
KQEH (PBS) 2
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
in a barnburner of a race that may well decide which party controls the u.s. senate. with the stakes so high, this race is attracting big money from lots of outside groups. the incumbent fighting to hold onto his seat is democrat jon tester. and he says he's not happy about all this outside money. >> we're going to see a ton of money spent in montana. we're seeing money earlier, more of it, and with more regularity. and i think we're in the process right now of building a campaign infrastructure that's going to be very difficult to pull down as time goes on. it's getting to be big, big, big money. >> ryssdal: big money is at the heart of this story. two years ago, the supreme court changed the landscape of campaign finance with a controversial decision in a case called citizens united. it let corporations and unions spend unlimited amounts of money in campaigns. but to avoid corruption, the court said the money can't go directly to candidates. it has to go to independent outside groups. the key word here being independent. one supporter of citizens united is tester's opponent. >> see y'all l
>> the crash of continental flight 3407 in buffalo in february of 2009 was the deadliest u.s. air accident in a decade. >> it's the watershed accident. it's become the symbol of everything that's wrong with the industry. >> it focused attention on a major transformation in the airline industry. >> today's regional airlines are really the backbone of the domestic network system. >> tonight on frontline, correspondent miles o'brien journeys into the world of the regional airlines... >> the major airlines created the regional industry as a way of lowering costs. >> ...investigating the financial pressures... >> iwe didn't move those airplanes, they didn't make any money. >> ...examining the experience of the pilots... >> boy, in nine months, you were a captain? >> yeah. >> that's... that's quick. >> almost scary, isn't it? >> ...and asking what government regulators knew. >> it was horrifying. i think anyone that who read that file would have had the same questions that i had. >> tonight, frontline investigates how corners were cut on safety... >> i knew that this company was not pla
of skilled policy advocates driving a remarkable turnaround that has already changed the u.s. political landscape. >> warming isn't, in fact, accelerating. in fact, there's been none for 15 years. >> hockenberry: there's christopher monckton, a big draw at these meetings, who brings the skeptics to their feet every time. >> god bless america. >> hockenberry: republican congressman james sensenbrenner of wisconsin, vice chairman of the use science committee. >> paul krugman accused my colleagues and me of treason against the planet. (laughter) >> hockenberry: there's chris horner from the competitive enterprise institute... >> ...economic salvation. this is our way out. >> hockenberry: and james taylor, senior fellow at the heartland institute, organizer of this gathering. >> the debate indeed is over. in the years prior to 2007, the 2008 elections, we actually heard from many folks that we should tone it down on global warming, we should not talk about the issue, because the court of public opinion had already decided and we were on the losing end. but we believe that if we present the
illinois. most people probably couldn't pronounce his name. >> narrator: now he was running for the u.s. senate in illinois and was the keynote speaker at the 2004 democratic convention. >> the next senator from the state of illinois, barack obama! (crowd cheering) >> narrator: he was virtually unknown. but he had, in effect, been writing the speech since punahou, and oxy, and those long years in new york city. >> tonight is a particular honor for me because, let's face it, my presence on this stage is pretty unlikely. my father was a foreign student, born and raised in a small village in kenya. >> he put himself in the middle of the american story and he made people feel that there was still an america that could come together despite all of the divisions, and that in some way or another he was able to embody those aspirations about what americans thought they wanted to see happen in the country. >> there is not a liberal america and a conservative america, there is the united states of america. there is not a black america, a white america, a latino america, an asian america, there's
to be born in the u.s. my parents wasn't. i think i'm blessed to be born here, because i get to do more than them. >> stand up, straight, smile. >> now i can be a role model to my sisters and cousins, 'cause now they are looking up to me too. and my aunts, they respect me. when i go over sometimes they be, like, "look at the soldier, look at the soldier." i'm, like, "calm down. i'm still the same person. i'm still your cousin. i'm still family. just because i'm in the army, doesn't mean i'm gonna change," so... i guess it's my year now. >> i need y'all to smile. (music playing) >> i am pleased to announce your 2012 prom king and queen. (cheers) >> good morning, apollos, and welcome to the last day of school. it is thursday, may 31, 2012. >> the algebra end-of-course exam test results had come back. so we had a meeting to talk about the scores. this is the results based on met minimum for 2012 and 2013. so if you see, we are at 79% for satisfactory. notice that our advanced is the highest in the district. you know, i'm not going show the biology and the world geography and everything else. b
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)